“Voluntouring” for mind, body and spirit

By Glenda C. Booth
Posted on September 29, 2022

At nighttime in Botswana’s pitch-black Okavango Delta, I sat astride a 1,000-pound Nile crocodile while a scientist probed the croc’s posterior. A hippopotamus snorted within earshot. Years later, while visiting California’s Catalina Island, I searched the sand on hands and knees for nurdles, plastic orbs the size of a pencil eraser. On both trips, I was helping scientists with... READ MORE

Time to plan fall leaf-peeping excursions

By Ed Perkins
Posted on September 13, 2022

In case you haven’t already started, it’s time to plan for any fall foliage trips you might want to take. Although New England has pushed the idea that it is fall foliage central, you can find good fall foliage viewing throughout much of the U.S. and Canada — maples, oaks and such east of the Mississippi; aspens in the Rockies. Peak times typically move from north to south between... READ MORE

Paradise Coast: Naples and Marco Island

By Alice Shapin
Posted on September 07, 2022

It had been two years since my husband and I had flown anywhere for a vacation. We felt like bears emerging from hibernation — or maybe more like Rip Van Winkle. So, last spring, not quite ready to travel abroad and risk being stranded if we got Covid, we chose as our first venture the “Paradise Coast” of Southwest Florida. Along this 18-mile stretch are a pair of gems, Naples... READ MORE

3 travel lessons I wish I’d learned sooner

By Liz Weston
Posted on August 29, 2022

Almost every trip I take teaches me something about myself, the world, and what not to do next time. Here are three hard-won travel lessons that may help you learn from my mistakes: Cobbling together flights isn’t worth the savings Whenever possible, I book nonstop flights. Nonstops may cost a bit more, but they avoid the inconvenience of layovers and the stress of possibly missing a... READ MORE

Factory tours abound and are great fun

By Ed Perkins
Posted on August 18, 2022

A factory tour is perhaps the most underrated sort of attraction in the U.S. When I first started writing about factory tours, I highlighted them as the “best free attractions you could find,” but liability and staffing issues have forced many to start charging. Still, the chance to see exactly how some favorite item is made can be fascinating. And, fortunately, you can find an... READ MORE

Inn-to-inn hiking gains a foothold in U.S.

By Sandi Barrett
Posted on August 12, 2022

While the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail are popular hiking trips for the seasoned trekker, many travelers prefer a soft, cozy bed and a home-cooked meal at the end of a long day of walking. Multi-day walking trips offering these comforts are popping up across the country. Popular throughout Europe, curated backcountry tours are a kinder, gentler way to explore and still... READ MORE

We’re high on Rocky Mountain grandeur

By Don Mankin
Posted on August 02, 2022

The first time I drove to California from the East Coast, trying to escape a run of bad luck in love, life and career in my mid-20s, the Rocky Mountains loomed from the prairie, welcoming me to a new life. This past June, I had the opportunity to immerse myself once again in the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains on a road trip with my wife, Katherine. We looped from Denver through Boulder, ... READ MORE

A serene sojourn on San Juan Island

By Don Mankin
Posted on July 14, 2022

I sat motionless in my kayak, quietly gazing at the subdued land and seascape. The sky was grey, the water was flat, the wind was absent. Heaven. The heavy skies and occasional drizzle didn’t bother me. It was all just part of the moody ambience of the Pacific Northwest. I was midway through a three-day visit to San Juan Island in Washington State. The San Juan Islands — which... READ MORE

A visit to Cairo and cruise down the Nile

By Victor Block
Posted on July 07, 2022

My first impression on the ride from the Cairo airport to my hotel was: Big city. Cars and motorcycles battled for space in the traffic, their horns raising a constant din. Lighted signs for McDonald’s, Burger King and other familiar fast-food restaurants vied for attention with billboards touting trendy women’s fashions. Gradually, more anticipated touches of the destination... READ MORE

Visit little-known conservation museum

By Glenda C. Booth
Posted on June 22, 2022

As Congress considers a bill to create a Civilian Climate Corps, legislators might visit a little-known Richmond-area museum to study a much-lauded 1930s model. Nestled in the woods in Pocahontas State Park, 20 miles from downtown Richmond, is a museum dedicated to the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), a New Deal initiative that employed Americans from 1933 to 1942. The one-story,... READ MORE