Jewish films address universal themes

By Robert Friedman
Posted on January 30, 2012

The very human side of the propaganda-filled, seemingly intractable Arab-Israeli conflict is portrayed movingly in the Israeli film, For My Father, the first of four films in this year’s Jewish Film Series.The series has presented entertaining and thought-provoking films for 20 years. While films may have Jewish themes, they are “for the whole community to enjoy,” said Tom ... READ MORE

Black comedy spreads infectious humor

By Carol Sorgen
Posted on January 23, 2012

You’re probably familiar with the popular film, Arsenic and Old Lace, starring Cary Grant. But if you’ve never seen the play that inspired the movie, hightail it down to the Vagabond Players on weekends through Feb. 5 for this thoroughly entertaining comic romp.This classic theatrical staple, written by American playwright Joseph Kesselring, has been an audience favorite since... READ MORE

New book depicts Baltimore’s home front

By Carol Sorgen
Posted on January 23, 2012

In 2006, Gil Sandler found himself in the library of the Baltimore Sun, doing research for his weekly editorial page column, “Baltimore Glimpses.” Coming across the issue dated June 20, 1944, Sandler read of the battle of Saipan, known as Operation Forager, designed to take control of the Mariana Islands.Sandler himself had been engaged in that operation, serving aboard the USS... READ MORE

Arts Fest more than its name implies

By Connie George
Posted on January 16, 2012

The Southwest Arts Festival (SWAF) celebrates its 26th anniversary this month with more than 250 acclaimed artists in an abundance of creative disciplines and a solid reputation as a promising venue for art collectors — in spite of a name that organizers say often presents a marketing challenge.“The Southwest Arts Festival is so much more than Southwest style,” said... READ MORE

Ann Richards portrayal aims for Broadway

By Michael Toscano
Posted on January 09, 2012

The Kennedy Center is gambling with its production of Ann, the one-woman show about the late Texas governor, Ann Richards.Gambling, first, that fading memories of the outspoken Richards will attract enough folks to make an anticipated spring opening on Broadway feasible. And gambling, second, that a one-woman show will have the drawing power to sustain a run.If memory of the late Ann... READ MORE

Lifelong learning classes from A to Z

By Carol Sorgen
Posted on December 26, 2011

If the winter doldrums are setting in, it may be time to stretch both your legs and your mind at any of a number of continuing education programs offered around town. From aerobics to zoology, there is sure to be something to pique your interest.Here are just a few to consider. Call those of interest for more details, including topics, dates, times and fees.Osher Lifelong LearningThe... READ MORE

The Lion King roars back into Baltimore

By Carol Sorgen
Posted on December 26, 2011

Disney’s dazzling musical The Lion King is in residence at the Hippodrome Theatre until Jan. 8. I can understand how the many youngsters in the audience opening night might never have seen the stage production before, but I’m not sure how I have managed to miss it all these years.All I can say is, better late than never. And whether you have seen it before or not, it is well... READ MORE

Linda Lavin on her busy career, new CD

By Mark Kennedy
Posted on December 01, 2011

Linda Lavin was in two well-received productions last season that are on Broadway this fall: Follies at the Kennedy Center and Other Desert Cities at Lincoln Center.So which one is she doing in New York? Neither.Lavin instead took a strong part in Nick Silver’s new play The Lyons, which opened off-Broadway in October at the Vineyard Theater.“There’re absolutely no regrets. ... READ MORE

Actors excel in adaptation of Austen novel

By Michael Toscano
Posted on December 01, 2011

How do you adapt a venerated, 400-page novel for the stage, especially in this era of fragmented, Blackberry-addled attention spans?Fairly well, if you’re Joseph Hanreddy and J.R. Sullivan, whose version of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is now onstage at Round House Theatre Bethesda.It’s a longish show, running (with intermission) at almost two hours and 45 minutes on... READ MORE

Private Lives sparkles at Everyman Theatre

By Carol Sorgen
Posted on November 18, 2011

Noel Coward’s 1930’s comedy of manners, Private Lives, is a lighter-than-meringue confection. For a thoroughly enjoyable bit of escapism, this production currently playing at Everyman Theatre is right on the mark.The plot is simple: Amanda and Elyot divorced five years ago but find themselves suite-by-suite on the French Riviera, each honeymooning with a new spouse, Victor and... READ MORE